The Contemporary Austin – Jones Center

The Jones Center Museum (previously the Austin History Center) puts a new spin on museums by showcasing art, architecture, and culture in an interactive manner. Located at 700 Congress Ave., Austin, TX 78701, the Jones Center is home to more than 60 permanent and temporary exhibitions that feature modern architecture, industrial design, and fine art. The Jones Center also houses several of Austin’s most iconic buildings including The Walter Carl Corp Building and the J.C. Nichols Jr. Building which are both listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Modernist Design of the Walter Carl Corp. Building

The Walter Carl Corp. Building is an architectural marvel that showcases the work of an influential Modernist designer. The Walter Carl Corp. Building was designed by Marcel Breuer, who is best known for his work in public buildings. The Walter Carl Corp. Building was built in 1968, and it is located on Congress Avenue across from the Brackenridge Park Conservatory. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. The Walter Carl Corp. Building is made up of six interlocking steel structures that create a pavilion-like structure. The exterior of the building is covered in polished stainless steel panels and the roof has large stainless steel panels that hang over the main entrance. The building’s interior also features a polished gray marble floor that is supported by gray steel beams. This modernist design of the Walter Carl Corp. Building really stands out in Downtown Austin, and it also features some very impressive architectural features. See this site

The J.C. Nichols Jr. Building

The J.C. Nichols Jr. Building is one of Austin’s most iconic buildings and it was built in the early 1900s. The J.C. Nichols Jr. Building is located on the corner of Congress Avenue and Eighth Street, and it was constructed from 1906 to 1907. The J.C. Nichols Jr. Building is named after the man who owned Austin’s first newspaper, and it was also the first home for the Austin American-Statesman. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and it is one of the few structures that are still standing in Downtown Austin that was built around the turn of the 20th century. The J.C. Nichols Jr. Building is an impressive example of turn-of-the-century architecture, and it features a number of different architectural styles including Classical Revival, Art Deco, and Prairie-style style. The building is built with brick, steel, and terra cotta, and it is topped by a pediment adorned with a garland of fruit. The J.C. Nichols Jr. Building’s exterior features elaborate round-arch windows, and there are also cast-iron balcony railings on the outside of the building.

The Five Stages of Construction at the Jones Center Museum Exhibition

The Jones Center Museum has a number of permanent exhibitions that showcase the city’s architecture and art history. One of these exhibitions is Five Stages of Construction at the Jones Center Museum Exhibition, and it was created to showcase the Jones Center’s construction timeline. The exhibition uses five different models to trace the construction of the Jones Center Museum buildings, and visitors can also use the timeline to trace where they were when the building was built. The Jones Center Museum was constructed in five stages to make the project more budget-friendly. Construction on the first building began in 1997 and it opened in 1999. The first building was a three-story building that was located on East Fifth Street and it was replaced in 2013. Construction on the second building began in 2000, and it opened in 2006. This building was located on Congress Avenue, and it was designed to look like a wooden fence. Helpful site

In-Depth Research at Austin History Center

The Jones Center Museum is home to a wealth of Austin history, and one of the permanent exhibitions at the Jones Center is In-Depth Research at Austin History Center. This exhibition is dedicated to the city’s history, and it includes photos, artifacts, and documents that trace Austin’s history from the earliest days of human habitation to present-day times. The In-Depth Research at Austin History Center permanent exhibition is located in the Jones Center’s Great Room, and it is open to the public at no charge. The Jones Center Museum also houses the Texas Smartphone Museum that presents more than 20 interactive exhibits designed to show visitors how smartphones work and how they are used in everyday life.